Friday, February 10, 2017

Fast Shoot, Freeze Movements

To avoid motion blur and "freeze" motion, relatively high shutter speeds are required in photography. "Relative" is because the moving speed of the motif plays a decisive role. So significantly shorter times are required as a worm races for freezing an arrow in flight. In addition, the required exposure times of focal length, movement direction and distance depend. This makes an exact indication of required shutter speeds difficult.

Therefore, you should consider the following information as output values, which should not exceed one if the movement is to be frozen in the recording. If possible, you can also select shorter times. According to the motto: The shorter, the better. Because aspects such as focal length, movement direction and distance affect the outcome, you should vary with the exposure values ​​to get a feel for the effect of exposure time.

Experience of classical motifs
Maximum shutter speed to freeze the motion

Auto 1/250 sec
Children 1/250 sec
Dog while frolicking 1/500 sec
Runners at sporting events 1/800 sec
Float 1/500 sec
Water Drops 1/500 sec

In summary, one can find that shutter speeds, which are shorter than 1/500 second, usually enough to freeze fast movements in the photo.

How do I get faster shutter speeds?
The exposure time depends on the light conditions, the lens used, the film material (with analog photography) and the camera's current settings. In order to achieve a correspondingly short exposure time, you may need to open the aperture and / or increase the ISO speed.

As a program for controlling the exposure time is recommended often auto iris (T, TV). Due to the limited possibilities of variation, which are the shutter priority at different stops available, however, the priority (A, AV) is often a better choice. This is achieved through the correct setting of aperture and ISO setting the desired exposure time. Should there be strong brightness changes occur (eg. As when moving from direct sun and cloud in front of the sun), this may lead to undesirable longer exposure times and thus wiping effects (motion blur). The advantage of this mode, however, is that, in contrast to the auto iris comes through the wide variation of different exposure times, which are the camera in this mode only rarely to an over- or underexposure. When using the Shutter Priority should therefore be focussed on the display of the aperture value or the over- or under-exposure warning.

In order to obtain a sharp picture you need to consider the effects of camera shake during handheld shooting. This is dependent on the exposure time and the focal length used. For more information on the relationship between shutter speed and focal length with respect to the effects of camera shake can be found here - link to the article.

Fast Shoot, Freeze Movements
Boy with ball - Spain

Exposure Time: 1/400 sec.
Aperture: f / 7.1
ISO Speed: 100
Focal length: 450mm

Fast Shoot, Freeze Movements
Kitesurfer jumping - Italy

Exposure Time: 1/800 sec.
Aperture: f / 10
ISO Speed: 100
Focal length: 600mm


Fast Shoot, Freeze Movements
Jumping into the water - Havana - Cuba

Exposure Time: 1/800 sec.
Aperture: f / 8
ISO Speed: 200
Focal length: 50mm

Fast Shoot, Freeze Movements
Thrust into the water - children playing - Cuba

Exposure Time: 1/500 sec.
Aperture: f / 9
ISO Speed: 100
Focal length: 150mm

The following picture is taken with a little too slow shutter speed to completely freeze the movement of the child. By shortening the shutter speed to 1/250 or 1/500 seconds the motion blur could be avoided. This would be reached via an opening of the diaphragm, as well as through an increase of the ISO value. On the other hand, the remaining motion blur generated additional momentum.

Fast Shoot, Freeze Movements
Children playing - Cuba
Exposure Time: 1/160 sec.
Aperture: f / 9
ISO Speed: 100
Focal length: 50mm

Forget about the freezing of movements not the numerous design options that are possible by motion blur. Image and source; http://kleine-fotoschule.de/

Artikel Terkait